Family Life: Julie Blackmon

Reading Time: 2 minutes

If you brought David Lynch along as the activities director on your family vacation or asked him over to art direct your holiday postcards, you might get something similar to the photography of Julie Blackmon, and we mean that in the best way possible. At first glance, many of the pieces feel random or even haphazard, yet going deeper reveals that there is purpose behind this work. “The stress, the chaos, and the need to simultaneously escape and connect are issues that I investigate in this body of work,” Blackmon says. “Caught in the swirl of soccer practices, play dates, work, and trying to find our way in our “make-over” culture, we must still create the space to find ourselves.” One of the things we love about her work is the scale. While the depicted events are often trivial and mundane, the fact that many of the prints are nearly four feet across make these banalities somehow larger than life, and more important because of it. Then there are her black & white photographs, which are at the same time far less complex yet, at least to me, much more powerful. They remind me of Sally Mann or Mary Ellen Mark. The lack of color and the often singular subjects, make for a more intimate and personal connection between the viewer and the work.

 

Julie Blackmon

Julie Blackmon

Julie Blackmon

Julie Blackmon

Julie Blackmon

Julie Blackmon

[via Free York]

 

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