Crafting Dissonance: Jeremy Geddes

Reading Time: 2 minutes

“I wanted to construct my own reality through my paintings, a quiet melancholic space that operates by it’s own set of underlying rules and runs it’s own oblique narrative. With each successive painting, I try to build the world and uncover it’s form.” – Jeremy Geddes, from an interview with Arrested Motion

The first painting I ever saw by Australian artist Jeremy Geddes was from his Cosmonaut series. Something about it resonated very deeply, and it’s odd that I really can’t say why. There have only been a handful of artists that I have really connected with the first time I saw their work, most of them for very definite reasons. For example, Boucher and Fragonard for their expert draftsmanship and the way they handle the figure. Or, Robert Rauschenberg for his sheer boldness and the way his work challenged the notion of what art could or should be. But, with Jeremy Geddes, it’s less of a tangible connection and much more emotional. I’ve walked through the world that he has created (figuratively, of course) and find it not only familiar, but somehow comforting. There’s a strange peace in the bleak solitude of this place, brought to life in staggering detail under his brush. Geddes often takes months to complete a single painting, sketching and painting studies and details long before beginning the final piece. His meticulous attention to detail is captured beautifully in works like 2011’s A Perfect Vacuum, shown above. Yet, despite the realism of his work, Geddes doesn’t see them as photorealistic, instead offering that he is merely “attempting to follow in the path of the Academic painters of the 19th century.” Whether an Academic or a Realist, Jeremy Geddes uses the detail to craft a world the viewer is able to connect with, to feel, to react to, and isn’t that the point of art in the first place?

 

Jeremy Geddes

Jeremy Geddes

Jeremy Geddes

Jeremy Geddes

Jeremy Geddes

[via Escape Into Life]